Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Release 0.2 Fourth Issue and End of Hacktoberfest

The project itself is a platform for people to tag areas on a map and create reports. The platform is usually used by NGOs or first responders to manage disaster areas and this resonated with me as I always wanted to contribute to a project that helps people in helping others.

I chanced upon this bug as a pity one while working on another bug for the same project. This issue should've been either my first or second issue instead as the scope was very well defined and they were very clear on what to change to fix the issue. The issue can be found here, simply put the issue is there's a drop down that hides the language selector, but once a user enables the drop down.... there is another drop down to select the language which was redundant.

 The front end of the project is written in angular and the change was pretty simple

<div class="tool"> <h6 class="tool-heading" translate="app.language">Language</h6> <span class="tool-trigger init" ng-class="{'active': showLanguage}" ng-click="languageToggle()"> <svg class="iconic"> <use xlink:href="/img/iconic-sprite.svg#chevron-bottom"></use> </svg> <span class="label hidden">Show/hide</span> <span class="tool-trigger init" ng-class="{'active': showLanguage}"></span> <language-switch></language-switch> <div class="toggle-content" ng-class="{'active': showLanguage}"> <language-switch></language-switch> </div> </div>

I removed the <span> and the <svg> which contained the first language drop down and the arrow which shows beside it respectively.

<div class="tool"> <h6 class="tool-heading" translate="app.language">Language</h6> <span class="tool-trigger init" ng-class="{'active': showLanguage}"></span> <language-switch></language-switch> <div class="toggle-content" ng-class="{'active': showLanguage}"> </div> </div>

AND THAT IS A WRAP FOR HACKTOBERFEST.

This event was extremely nerve wracking, after we finish one issue, we're on the hunt for another that is hopefully not taken by someone. But I'm also thankful as previous to this event and the class (OSD600) in general, I always wanted to contribute to open source, but the massive code bases we had to navigate through as well as the thought of attempting an issue and failing always scared me off.

Did I hit any of my goals? As someone who didn't even understand ways to fix issues posted in the issues tab of projects. Yes. After this event I am much more comfortable with contributing to projects now.

I know:
  • how to use git other than just creating a branch and pushing it to origin
  • I can contribute to a project that has a million lines of code spread out through multiple files and folders
  • how to identify code causing bugs
  • different ways to contribute to a project than writing new functions or fixing code(such as installing a new version of an existing module or library to a project)
Now if I can get that t-shirt for the event from submitting 4 PRs I would consider this a total success!


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